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    • Tiffany Tour

    • Neustadt Collection of Tiffany Glass

      Since 1995, the Neustadt Collection of Tiffany Glass has partnered with the Queens Museum. In a permanent gallery featuring changing exhibitions, students explore how Louis Comfort Tiffany captured nature and transformed it into beautiful lamps and windows of exquisite color and fine detail. Tours and studio workshops explore Tiffany in a historical and cultural perspective.

      Young Artists, tour and workshop (Pre-K-Grade 2)

      Students discover Louis Comfort Tiffany’s glass through a variety of hands-on experiences designed to address the developmental and learning needs of young children. Students participate in storytelling, movement exercises and hands-on art making activities that focus on pre-literacy skills such as shape, color, and pattern recognition, as well as creativity and self-expression. In conjunction with a guided discussion in the Tiffany gallery, students construct faux stained glass window panes using construction paper, transparency paper, and collage materials in the studio.

      Intentional connections: literacy and cognitive development

      From Nature to Geometry, tour + workshop (Grades 2-12)

      Using photos available at the Museum, students select images that interest them and decide how to transform the natural shapes into geometric forms, drawing on paper marietals of their choice. Students then create geometric collages, turning the natural images into the abstract.

      Intentional connection: math

      Stylized

      Students sketch from observation during their exhibition tour, choosing at least three different styles of representation found in the gallery. In the studio workshop, students choose which style they prefer, and translate that into their own "stained glass” window collage using papers to reflect the types of glass used in the original artwork.

      Intentional connections: literacy and math

      Letters to Louise C. Tiffany

      Before a Tiffany piece was created, designers had to communicate with Dr. Neustadt to identify the style that should be used (realistic, semi realistic, decorative, symbolic, or abstract). In this workshop, students take on both the role of the designer and the role of Dr. Neustadt. They begin by choosing images they respond to, and compose a letter of inquiry in the grammatical style used at the turn of the century, asking Dr. Neustadt to advise them on the style that should be used. Classmates swap letters and students will assume the role of Dr. Neustadt, responding with their advice, and return the letters to the original writers. Students then create a drawing or collage based on the suggested style. This workshop can be divided into pre- and post-visit activities with guidance from Museum staff.

      Intentional connection: literacy

    • Queens Museum
      New York City Building
      Flushing Meadows Corona Park
      Queens, NY 11368
    • T 718 592 9700
      F 718 592 5778
      E info@queensmuseum.org